Garrett, Roy

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MILITARY HISTORY

Private Roy Braden Garrett – 637496 — RESERVE SERVICE (World War II)

Roy Braden Garrett was 20 years, 4 months and 12 days old when, as a single man, he was Attested, on May 28, 1940, into the Prince of Wales Rangers at Peterborough, Ontario. Roy Braden indicated that he was born January 16, 1920 in Canada and he had no previous Military Service. He was 5′ 9½” tall, had a 41″ chest and weighed 166 pounds. Roy Braden indicated that he worked as a farm labourer for S. Hockaday and lived at RR #2 Lakefield, Ontario. Roy Braden’s next-of-kin was listed as his father, E. Garrett of RR #2 Lakefield, Ontario. On May 28, 1940 he was assigned the rank of Private (Pte) with Regimental Number, 566 and posted to “A” Company. On September 17, 1940 Pte Garrett was assigned a new Regimental Number; 637496. Then on October 1, 1940 Pte Garrett was struck-off-strength from the Prince of Wales Rangers; Pte Garrett was already enlisted in the Active Service as a member of the Stormont, Dundas & Glengarry Highlanders Regiment.

Sergeant Roy Braden Garrett – C 53041 — ACTIVE SERVICE (World War II)

Roy Braden Garrett was 20 years, 5 months and 8 days old when, as a single man, he was Attested, on June 24, 1940, into the Stormont, Dundas & Glengarry Highlanders (SDGH) Regiment at Peterborough, Ontario. Roy Braden indicated that he was born January 16, 1920 in Douro Township, Peterborough County, Canada; had previous Service and belonged to the Prince of Wales Rangers since May 28, 1940. He was 5′ 9½” tall, blue eyes, had a 41″ chest and weighed 166 pounds and lived at RR #2 Lakefield, Ontario. Roy Braden completed Public School (Grade 8) and left school to work. He indicated that his trade was as a farmer but he worked as a lumberman and labourer for various persons. Roy Braden’s next-of-kin was listed as his father, Ernest Garrett, a labourer, of RR #2 Lakefield, Ontario. He indicated that he was contributing partial support of $10.00 monthly to his mother and he was insured with Confederation Life which will be paid by a pay assignment. On June 24, 1940 Roy Braden was assigned the rank of Private (Pte) and his Regimental Number, C-53041.

Although not stated in his records, Pte Garrett was posted to Ottawa, Ontario and would have been on training from June through November 13, 1940 when he was appointed to the Acting Corporal (A/Cpl) rank. On December 8, 1940 A/Cpl Garrett was admitted to the Range Road Hospital in Ottawa with a diagnosis of flu; he was discharged on December 12, 1940. December 27, 1940 A/Cpl Garrett was granted a furlough from December 27, 1940 to January 14, 1941 which probably allowed him to visit his home before being posted January 27, 1941 to Debert, Nova Scotia. Although not stated in his records, A/Cpl Garrett would have been on training and assigned duties until May 20, 1941 when he was admitted to the Debert Military Hospital with an appendicitis; an appendectomy was done. A/Cpl Garrett was discharged from the Hospital on June 4, 1941. June 6, 1941 he was granted Sick Leave with Subsistence Allowance until July 5, 1941. July 12, 1941 A/Cpl Garrett was medically examined and categorized “A” in Debert. He embarked Halifax, Nova Scotia on July 21, 1941 and was struck-off-strength from the Canadian Army (Active).

On July 22, 1941 A/Cpl Garrett was taken-on-strength to the Canadian Army (Overseas) and July 31, 1941 he disembarked at Avonmouth, England to join the SDGH at Aldershot, England. He was granted Landing Leave with Travel Warrant from August 15 to 19, 1941 then on August 23, 1941 A/Cpl Garrett was confirmed in the rank of Corporal (Cpl). Cpl Garrett was attached to Electronic & Support Equipment Communications (E&SE Comm) for a Course in Small Arms Anti-Aircraft (AA) Defence in Dorking, England from October 5 to 11, 1941; he qualified “Q-1” in Small Arms AA Defence and was qualified as an Assistant Instructor. December 4, 1941 Cpl Garrett was granted his 1st Privileged Leave, with Travel Warrant, from December 4 to 11, 1941.

January 19, 1942 Cpl Garrett was attached to the London District Anti-Aircraft Light Machine Gun (AA LMG) School in Seaford, England for all purposes (fap) except pay and ceased to be attached January 24, 1942. For the next four months Cpl Garrett would have been on training, courses and assigned duties with the SDGH in the United Kingdom (UK). On March 10, 1942 he qualified Driver i/c motor car (m/c) tracked and wheeled (T&W).

The following was extracted from an interview that Cpl Garrett had on March 30, 1942:
“Assurance and intelligence average. Good physical type. Aggressive and has a pleasant personality. Would think that he is good at man management. Should be a good NCO. Wants to be a dispatch rider or failing that to transfer to the Forestry Corps. He has done a lot of work in the latter line and likes it. Feels that he would do better and be better satisfied with unit.”

On April 27, 1942 he was granted Privileged Leave to May 3, 1942 with Subsistence and Travel Warrant. August 10, 1942 Cpl Garrett was granted 7 days Privileged Leave to August 16, 1942. September 14, 1942 Cpl Garrett was appointed to an Acting Lance Sergeant (A/L/Sgt); October 12, 1942 he was appointed to an Acting Sergeant (A/Sgt). November 16, 1942 A/Sgt Garrett proceeded on Canadian Military Headquarters (CMHQ) Course 322 (LMG) and attached to the Small Arms School fap until November 27, 1942 when he qualified “Q-1”. December 14, 1942 A/Sgt Garrett was appointed to Lance Sergeant (L/Sgt).

January 25, 1943 L/Sgt Garrett was confirmed in the rank of Sergeant (Sgt). For the next 4½ months Sgt Garrett would have been on duty commanding a group of SDGH soldiers and training for future employments. March 27, 1943 he was granted 7 days Privileged Leave to April 3, 1943. Again, for about the next six months Sgt Garrett would have been in-charge of a group of soldiers, on training, courses and assigned duties with the SDGH in the United Kingdom (UK). June 13, 1943 he was attached fap to No 3 Anti-Tank Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery (RCA) for 4 days to June 16, 1943. July 13, 1943 Sgt Garrett was granted 8 days Privileged Leave to July 21, 1943. After another 6 months of no comments in his records, on January 15, 1944
Sgt Garrett was awarded the Canadian Volunteer Service Medal and Clasp.
A further five months passed with no indications in his records when, on June 4, 1944 Sgt Garrett embarked the UK and 2 days later disembarked in France on D-Day. The previous periods on extended training would have been in preparation for the D-Day landing. Sgt Garrett would have gone ashore as part of the 9th Canadian Infantry Brigade which was a follow-up Force that landed in Nan Sector of Juno Beach. (see JUNO BEACH – OPERATION OVERLORD which follows) The Stormont, Dundas & Glengarry Highlanders landed in Normandy on D-Day and was the first Regiment to enter Caen, reaching the centre of the city at 1300 hours, July 9, 1944.

July 10, 1944 Sgt Garrett was wounded and transferred to the X-3 List. July 11, 1943 he was transferred to No 11 Canadian General Hospital in England. July 18, 1944 Sgt Garrett was transferred to No 18 Canadian General Hospital in England. With effect July 29, 1944 Sgt Garrett was struck-off-strength from X-3 List to Y-3 List No 4 Canadian Infantry Reinforcement Unit. On October 27, 1944 he was discharged from No 18 Canadian General Hospital. Sgt Garrett’s Unit was re-designated to Y-List No 3 Canadian Infantry Training Regiment (No 3 CITR).

The following was extracted from an interview that Sgt Garrett had on February 12, 1945:
“Battle casualty NCO with residual soreness and low pulhems. Was roughly handled in France by enemy shrapnel. Attitude reasonab1e but preparation for duties fitting his rank has been only in combatant direction. Confirmed Sgt 25 Jan 43. Doesn’t like prospect of losing stripes now — feels (rightly) that he earned them the hard way. Unless unskilled duties are available in NCO rank, satisfactory employment is problematical. Possible jobs in semi-skilled administrative category within his pulhems, e.g. NCO in charge of working party or conducting NCO are suggested in trial basis. Some experience as Orderly (not Orderly Room) Sgt.”

On April 14, 1945 he was struck-off-strength from No 3 CITR to No 1 Canadian Repatriation Depot (No 1 CRD). April 22, 1945 Sgt Garrett was struck-off-strength from the Canadian Army (Overseas) and No 1 Non Effective Transit Depot. April 23, 1945 he was taken-on-strength to No 1 CRD in Kingston, Ontario. May 6, 1945 Sgt Garrett was granted Disembarkation Leave to June 6, 1945. On June 20, 1945 Sergeant Roy Braden Garrett was discharged, in Kingston, Ontario, from the Canadian Army on demobilization and returned to civil life. He received a Rehabilitation Grant and a Clothing Allowance.

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According to his military records; Sergeant Roy Braden Garrett earned the following medals:
1939 – 45 Star;
France & Germany Star;
Defence Medal;
Canadian Volunteer Service Medal & Clasp; and
War Medal 1939 – 45
He was also awarded the War Service Badge – Class “A”.
Roy Braden Garrett served for 1 year and 2 months in Canada, 3 years in the United Kingdom and 1 month in France for a total time of about 4 years 3 months including travel time. During his time in the Service he probably allotted $20.00 per month of his pay to his mother, Lillian Garrett.

An excerpt from an article in McLean’s magazine by Barbara Amid, September 1996:

The military is the single calling in the world with job specifications that include a commitment to die for your nation. What could be more honorable?

JUNO BEACH — OPERATION OVERLORD — June 6, 1944

Juno beach was five miles wide and stretched on either side of Courseulles-sur-Mer.

The Stormont, Dundas & Glengarry Highlanders is a Primary Reserve Infantry Regiment of the Canadian Army. It is part of 33 Canadian Brigade Group, 4th Canadian Division and is headquartered in Cornwall, Ontario
Land — Canadian Army
3rd Canadian Infantry Division
Mike Sector – 7th CANADIAN INFANTRY BRIGADE
1st Battalion, The Royal Winnipeg Rifles
1st Battalion, The Canadian Scottish Regiment (Victoria)
6th Armoured Regiment (1st Hussars) (London, Ontario) (Sherman DD)
1st Battalion, The Cameron Highlanders of Ottawa (Machine Gun)
7 Canadian Infantry Brigade Ground Defence Platoon (Lorne Scots)

Nan Sector – 8th CANADIAN INFANTRY BRIGADE
1st Battalion, The Regina Rifle Regiment
1st Battalion, The Queen’s Own Rifles of Canada (Toronto)
1st Battalion, The North Shore (New Brunswick) Regiment
1st Battalion, Le Régiment de la Chaudière (LCvis, Québec)
10th Armoured Regiment (The Fort Garry Horse) (Winnipeg) (Sherman DD)
8 Canadian Infantry Brigade Ground Defence Platoon (Lorne Scots)

Follow-up forces landed in Nan Sector – 9th CANADIAN INFANTRY BRIGADE
1st Battalion, The Highland Light Infantry of Canada (Galt, Ontario)
1st Battalion, The Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry Highlanders (Cornwall, Ontario)
1st Battalion, The North Nova Scotia Highlanders
27th Armoured Regiment (The Sherbrooke Fusiliers Regiment) (Québec)
1st Battalion, The Cameron Highlanders of Ottawa (Machine Gun)
9 Canadian Infantry Brigade Ground Defence Platoon (Lorne Scots)

Juno or Juno Beach was one of five beaches of the Allied invasion of German occupied France in the Normandy landings on 6 June 1944, during the Second World War. The beach spanned from Courseulles-sur-Mer, a village just east of the British beach Gold, to Saint-Aubin-sur-Mer, just west of the British beach Sword. The objectives of the 3rd Division on D-Day were to cut the Caen-Bayeux road, seize the Carpiquet airport west of Caen, and form a link between the two British beaches of Gold and Sword on either side of Juno Beach. Taking Juno was the responsibility of the 3rd Canadian Infantry Division and commandos of the Royal Marines, all under the command of British I Corps, with support from Naval Force J, the Juno contingent of the invasion fleet, including the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN). The beach was defended by two Battalions of the German 716th Infantry Division, with elements of the 21st Panzer Division held in reserve near Caen.

The invasion plan called for two Brigades of the 3rd Canadian Division to land on two beach sectors—Mike and Nan—focusing on Courseulles, Bernières and Saint-Aubin. It was hoped that the preliminary Naval and Air bombardments would soften up the beach defences and destroy coastal strong points. Close support on the beaches was to be provided by amphibious tanks of the 2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade. Once the landing zones were secured, the plan called for the 9th Canadian Infantry Brigade to land reserve Battalions and deploy inland, the Royal Marine commandos to establish contact with the British 3rd Infantry Division on Sword Beach and the 7th Canadian Infantry Brigade to link up with the British 50th (Northumbrian) Infantry Division on Gold Beach. The 3rd Canadian Division’s D-Day objectives were to capture Carpiquet Airfield and reach the Caen–Bayeux railway line by nightfall.

The 3rd Canadian Infantry Division with the 2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade under command landed in two Brigade Groups, the 7th Canadian Infantry Brigade and the 8th Canadian Infantry Brigade. Each Brigade had three Infantry Battalions and an Armoured Regiment in support, 2 Artillery Field Regiments, Combat Engineer Companies and extra Units from the 79th Armoured Division. The Fort Garry Horse tanks (10th Armoured Regiment) supported the 7th Brigade landing on the left and the 1st Hussars tanks (6th Armoured Regiment) supported the landing on the right.
The 9th Canadian Infantry Brigade was kept in reserve and landed later that day and advanced through the lead Brigades. The Sherbrooke Fusiliers tanks (27th Armoured Regiment) provided tank support.
The initial assault was carried out by:

North Shore Regiment on the left at St. Aubin (Nan Red beach)
Queen’s Own Rifles in the centre at Bernières (Nan White beach)
Regina Rifles at Courseulles (Nan Green beach)
Royal Winnipeg Rifles on the western edge of Courseulles (Mike Red and Mike Green beaches)
Canadian Air, Land and Sea Forces suffered approximately 950 casualties on D-Day, the majority being soldiers of the 3rd Canadian Division. By noon, the entire Division was ashore and leading elements had pushed several kilometres inland to seize bridges over the Seulles River. By 6:00 pm they had captured the town of Saint-Aubin-sur-Mer. A 1st Hussars Armoured Troop reached its objective along with men of The Queen’s Own Rifles of Canada before nightfall, when both Units moved 15 km inland and crossed the Caen-Bayeux highway. However, this Troop was forced to pull back because they had passed the supporting Infantry. By the end of D-Day the Division had penetrated farther into France than any other Allied force, though counter-attacks by elements of two German Armoured Divisions prevented further major gains for four weeks.
None of the assault Divisions, including 3rd Canadian Division, had managed to secure their D-Day objectives, which lay inland, although the Canadians came closer than any other Allied formation.
By the end of the next day, the Canadian Forces had linked up with the British Forces that had landed at Sword Beach.

PERSONAL HISTORY

ROY BRADEN GARRETT

Roy Braden was born January 16, 1920 in Douro Township, Peterborough County, Ontario, son of Ernest Garrett and Lillian Garrett. Roy completed Public School (Grade 8) in a rural school. He was 14 years old when he left school and pretty much away from his home most of his childhood working on jobs such as a Farm Labourer, Lumberman and Truck Driver. From 1934 to 1940 Roy worked as a lumberman, paying $16.00 weekly, in the winter months and farming work, paying $8.00 weekly, or truck driving, paying $16.00 weekly, in the summer months. The farm work was for Stanley Hockaday. Roy indicated that there was a Professional Society in Lakefield but there is no indication that he was a member.

Roy enjoyed hunting, swimming, skating and hockey (defense). He was sixth in a family of five boys and three girls. Roy was living with his Aunt Eva Cox before he enlisted in World War II in June of 1940. After the war, when Roy came home he went to live with his cousin Emma and her husband Russell Broadbent in Markham. He took a job with Superior Propane. Later Roy moved back to the Lakefield area staying with family. He owned a cottage on Chemong Lake near Selwyn in the 1950’s and spent his summers there. Roy boarded with his youngest sister and her husband until the 1970’s then rented a room at Motel 28 on the Lakefield Road.

Roy’s wounds suffered on July 10, 1944 left him with scars and a requirement to wear a leg brace for the rest of his life.

Roy Braden Garrett passed away on January 6, 1977; he is interred in Little Lake Cemetery in Peterborough.

THE ROY BRADEN GARRETT FAMILY OF DOURO TOWNSHIP

Roy Braden’s paternal great-grandparents were Joseph Garrett and Eliza Clacey born in England. His maternal great-grandparents were Thomas Scott and Rebecca Whatley born in England.

Roy Braden’s grandparents were Sidney Garrett and Emma Ann Harding of Douro Township. Peterborough County. His maternal grandparents were Frederick C. Garrett and Mary Jane Scott of Chandos Township, Peterborough County

Roy Braden’s parents and family: Ernest Garrett was born in Douro Township on January 6, 1882 and Lillian Garrett was born in Chandos Township on December 7, 1887. They were married on January 12, 1905 and settled in Douro Township near Galesburg and in later years moved to Seymour Township. Ernie passed away on July 19, 1958, age 76 years and Lillian (Lily) passed away on October 31, 1969, age 81 years; both are buried in Rosemount Memorial Gardens, Peterborough.

Ernie and Lily Garrett had 8 children; Henry “Harry” Garnett born June 3, 1906, Priscilla “Irene” Mae born June 4, 1908, Isaac Arthur born August 27, 1910, Emma “Olive” Lillian born December 23, 1913, William “Stanley” Ernest born February 4, 1917, Roy Braden born January 16, 1920, Hilliard Raymond born April 14, 1927, and Mary “Hazel” Marie born August 13, 1928.

This Personal History was provided courtesy of Roy & Sheila Garrett.

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