Junkin, Kenneth

JunkinKe1

MILITARY HISTORY

Private Kenneth Delmar Junkin – B 76397 — ACTIVE SERVICE (World War II)

Kenneth Delmar Junkin was 21 years old when, as a single man, he was Attested in Toronto, Ontario on November 24, 1939 with the Toronto Scottish Regiment, Machine Gun (MG), Canadian Active Service Force (CASF). Kenneth Delmar was enlisted for the duration of the War as a Private (Pte) and was assigned Service Number B 76397. Thomas Harcourt stated that he was born in Lakefield, Ontario on August 12, 1908; he was 5′ 7″ tall, had brown hair and brown eyes, chest 36″ and weighed 145 pounds. He had completed Grade 7 and left school at 14 years of age, however, he attended the Royal School – Stanley Barracks, Toronto in the Fall of 1929 for military training. Thomas Harcourt indicated that he had previous military experience from September 15, 1929 to 1939 with the Peterborough Regiment (Machine Gun) Non-Permanent Active Militia. His previous employment was listed as a truck driver and labourer. He was living at 31 Patricia Drive, Toronto Ontario; his next-of-kin is listed as his mother, Annie Junkin and his disabled father is Thomas Junkin, both of Lakefield Ontario. When employed Kenneth Delmar would provide his mother with $48.00 per month, however, he was on partial relief at present. Junkin’s entry medical was done in Toronto Ontario, November 24, 1939, he was considered fit for duty. On December 1, 1939 Pte. Junkin was taken-on-strength to the Regiment Depot to the 1st Battalion (Bn) “B” Company, Toronto Scottish Regiment Machine Gun (MG), CAFS for training.

On December 7, 1939 Pte Junkin embarked Halifax and was struck-off-strength from CASF Canada. December 8, 1939 he was taken-on-strength to CASF (Overseas) on transfer and disembarked at Gourock, Scotland December 14, 1939. December 22, 1939 Pte Junkin was placed on a 5-day pass to December 27, 1939 and travelled to Aldershot, England, still with the 1st Battalion (Bn) “B” Company, Toronto Scottish Regiment for training. After 6½ months of training, on July 19, 1940 Pte Junkin was placed On Command to the 3rd Canadian Infantry Battalion. About 3 weeks later on August 9, 1940 he was admitted to No 5 Canadian General Hospital near Taplow, Buckinghamshire, England; attached from 1st Battalion (Bn) “B” Company, Toronto Scottish Regiment to No 1 Machine Gun Holding Unit (MGHU). August 10, 1940 Pte Junkin was taken-on-strength on transfer to No 1 MGHU at Bordon England. September 17, 1940 he was discharged from No 5 Canadian General Hospital (no diagnoses was given).

On September 25, 1940 Pte Junkin was struck-off-strength on transfer from No 1 MGHU and taken-on-strength on transfer to the Toronto Scottish Regiment in the Field. From October 9 to October 14, 1940 he was on training in the Field with No 1 Machine Gun Reinforcement Unit (MGRU). Pte Junkin was granted Privileged Leave from October 23 to October 30, 1940. From October 14, 1940 to January 1, 1941 Pte Junkin was employed in the Field as a Cook in the Men’s Mess. From January 1 to 29, 1941 he was with No 1 MGRU on training. April 9, 1941 Pte Junkin was granted 7 days Privileged Leave to April 16, 1941. From June 1 to 29, 1941 Pte Junkin was attached to No 1 MGHU for training and was qualified as No 2 Gunner. August 30, 1941 he was Trade Tested for Cook Course “A” and qualified as a Cook by the Trades Training Board, Group “C” in the UK. The following 3 months Pte Junkin remained in the UK; September 5, 1941 he was granted Trades Pay, Group “C” Cook of $0.25 per day. On September 6, 1941 his Trades Pay, Group “C” Cook of $0.25 per day was ceased. September 17, 1941 Pte Junkin was granted 7 days leave to September 24, 1941. On September 27, 1941 he was admitted to No 5 Casualty Clearing Station and transferred to No 5 Canadian General Hospital. Also on September 27, 1941 Pte Junkin was attached to No 1 MGHU on admittance to the Hospital. Then on September 28, 1941 Pte Junkin was taken-on-strength to No 1 MGHU from the Toronto Scottish Regiment.

September 29, 1941 he was transferred from No 5 Canadian General Hospital to the No 1 Convalescent Depot (CD) and taken-on-strength to the Toronto Scottish Regiment in the UK. September 30, 1941 he was discharged from the Hospital. October 24, 1941 Pte Junkin was discharged from No 1 CD and November 12, 1941 he was re-boarded as Category “A-1”. On December 11, 1941 he was struck-off-strength from the Toronto Scottish Regiment to the Toronto Scottish Regiment (MG) and taken-on-strength to the Toronto Scottish Regiment (MG) December 12, 1941. January 3, 1942 Pte Junkin was admitted to No 1 Field Ambulance, no remarks on when he was discharged or transferred. On February 20, 1942 he was granted 14 days Privileged Leave until March 6, 1942. On May 20, 1942 Pte Junkin was granted 7 days Privileged Leave until May 27, 1942. July 15, 1942 to August 15, 1942 he qualified and was granted Trades Pay for Cook Group “C”. August 18, 1942 Pte Junkin embarked the UK for France as part of the Dieppe Raid and disembarked France August 19, 1942. The Dieppe Raid was a Second World War Allied attack on the German-occupied port of Dieppe. The raid took place on the northern coast of France on 19 August 1942. The assault began at 5:00 a.m. and by 10:50 a.m. the Allied commanders were forced to call a retreat. Virtually none of these objectives were met. Allied fire support was grossly inadequate and the raiding force was largely trapped on the beach by obstacles and German fire. After less than 10 hours since the first landings, the last Allied troops had all been either killed, evacuated, or left behind to be captured by the Germans. Instead of a demonstration of resolve, the bloody fiasco showed the world that the Allies could not hope to invade France for a long time. Some intelligence successes were achieved, including electronic intelligence. A total of 3,623 of the 6,086 men (almost 60%) who made it ashore were either killed (907), wounded, or captured (1,946). The Royal Air Force failed to lure the Luftwaffe into open battle, and lost 96 aircraft (at least 32 to flak or accidents), compared to 48 lost by the Luftwaffe. The Royal Navy lost 33 landing craft and one destroyer. The events at Dieppe influenced preparations for the North African (Operation Torch) and Normandy landings (Operation Overlord). Also on August 19, 1942 he qualified and was granted Trades Pay for Cook Group “C”. September 17, 1942 he ceases to draw Trades Pay for Cook Group “C” on being struck-off-strength from the Toronto Scottish Regiment (MG) to No 2 Division Infantry Reinforcement Unit (DIRU).

September 18, 1942 Pte Junkin was taken-on-strength to to No 2 Division Infantry Reinforcement Unit (DIRU) from the Toronto Scottish Regiment (MG). September 19, 1942 he was attached for all purposes (fap) from the Machine Gun Reinforcement Unit (MGRU) pending being taken-on-strength or transfer to the Royal Hamilton Light Infantry (RHLI), Wentworth Regiment. September 24, 1942 Pte Junkin was struck-off-strength from No 2 DIRU to the RHLI and on September 25, 1942 he was taken-on-strength with the RHLI. October 1, 1942 Pte Junkin was admitted to No 11 Field Ambulance and discharged from No 11 Field Ambulance October 4, 1942. He was granted Privileged Leave from October 20 to October 24, 1942. On November 5, 1942 Pte Junkin was admitted to No 11 Field Ambulance and then transferred to No 2 Casualty Clearing Station (CCS). November 18, 1942 he was admitted to No 15 Canadian General Hospital (CGH) at Bramshott, England and November 19, 1942 he was struck-off-strength from RHLI on admission to the Hospital and taken-on-strength to No 2 DIRU. Pte Junkin was discharged from the Hospital December 5, 1942 and on December 10, 1942 he was struck-off-strength from No 2 DIRU to the RHLI Regiment. December 11, 1942 Pte Junkin was taken-on-strength with the RHLI.

January 1, 1943 Pte Junkin was receiving the daily regimental rate of pay of $1.50. After 5 months in the Field Pte Junkin was admitted to No 2 CCS on May 3, 1943. On May 4, 1943 Pte Junkin was given permission to marry Miss Ethel Mildred Sparks. On May 5, 1943 he was removed from No 2 CCS and admitted to No 15 CGH with dermatitis. Also on May 5, 1943 he was struck-off-strength from RHLI to No 4 Canadian Infantry Reinforcement Unit (CIRU) on admission to the Hospital. On May 6, 1943 Pte Junkin was taken-on-strength to No 4 CIRU from the RHLI. On May 22, 1943 Pte Junkin was discharged from No 15 CGH and then on May 23, 1943 he married Miss Ethel Mildred Sparks. June 5, 1943 he was authorized a Trade rate-of-pay for Cook Group “C”. June 27, 1943 he was admitted to the Sutton Emergency Hospital at 1 Homewood Drive, Sutton, Surrey, with a laceration of the skull and possible concussion. On July 3, 1943 Pte Junkin was removed from the Sutton Emergency Hospital to No 14 Canadian General Hospital at Farnborough, England with a fractured skull; he is still with No 4 CIRU. About July 27, 1943 Pte Junkin’s daughter Barbara Ann was born in Lewisham, London England. He was discharged from No 14 Canadian General Hospital on August 9, 1943.

About May 1944 Pte Junkin’s his next-of-kin was changed to his wife at 49 Manor Park, Lewisham, London, England. June 7, 1944 Pte Junkin was awarded the 1939 – 45 Star and the Canadian Volunteer Service Medal and Clasp. June 30, 1944 Pte Junkin’s daughter Patricia Jean was born in Lewisham, London England. Pte Junkin was granted 5 days Compassionate Leave from June 26 to July 1, 1944 and then was granted an extension from July 2 to 6, 1944. September 2, 1944 he was Trade qualified as Cook Group “B”; ceases to draw pay as Cook Group “C”and draws pay as Cook Group “B”. Also on September 2, 1944 Pte Junkin was re-designated to No 3 Canadian Infantry Training Regiment (CITR). On September 21, 1944 he was granted 9 days Privileged Leave to September 30, 1944 with meal allowance. On November 11, 1944 his wife’s address changed to 58 The Mint, Rye Sussex, England. On December 17, 1944 Pte Junkin was admitted to No 3 Canadian Medical Centre (CMC). There was no indication of the diagnoses nor the date of discharge. On January 8, 1945 he was granted 9 days Privileged Leave to January 17, 1945 with meal allowance. Then, on January 29, 1945 his wife’s address changed to c/o Whitehouse Cottage, Peasmarsh, Rye Sussex, England. Then, finally his wife’s address changed to Lakefield Ontario, Canada on May 18, 1945.

On April 13, 1945 he was granted 9 days Privileged Leave to April 22, 1945. About April 30, 1945 Pte Junkin was transferred to the Permanent Establishment (PE) Depot Bn, then on May 31, 1945 he was moved from the PE Depot Bn to Reinforcements, Royal Canadian Army Service Corps (RCASC). On July 1, 1945 Pte Junkin was struck-off-strength from No 3 CITR and taken-on-strength to No 1 Canadian Repatriation Depot. July 6, 1945 Pte Junkin was struck-off-strength from the Canadian Army Overseas and the No 1 Canadian Repatriation Depot and taken-on-strength with No 2 District Depot. On July 13, 1945 he reported to No 2 District Depot (DD), Toronto. Although not stated Pte Junkin would have embarked England about July 6, 1945 and disembarked at Halifax, Nova Scotia July 13, 1945. He was granted Disembarkation Leave from July 14, 1945 to August 12, 1945 and authorized to draw Rations Allowance. Pte Junkin was struck-off-strength on discharge from the Canadian Active Service Force. He was paid Clothing Allowance and Rehabilitation Allowance. Pte Junkin was discharged on September 5, 1945 from No 2 District Depot, Toronto, Ontario. On return he lived at Lakefield, Ontario Box 435.
Pte Junkin was awarded the following medals:
1939 – 45 Star;
Defence Medal;
Canadian Volunteer Service Medal with Bar and
War Medal, 1939 – 45.
He was also awarded War Service Badge – Class “A”

Kenneth Delmar Junkin served in Canada for 2 weeks and in the United Kingdom for about 5 years and 9 months. He served for 2 days in France, on the Dieppe Raid August 19, 1942 which was before the qualification period for the France and Germany Star, therefore he did not get awarded that medal. He served for a total time of 5 years, 9 months and 12 days (including travel time). Kenneth Delmar served at Dieppe and later to a Re-enforcement Unit but other than for a very short time he was employed as a Cook, Group “B”.

Kenneth Delmar Junkin died July 11, 1970 in Peterborough, Ontario. He is interred in Hillside Cemetery, Lakefield Ontario
An excerpt from an article in McLean’s magazine by Barbara Amiel, September 1996:

The military is the single calling in the world with job specifications that include a commitment to die for your nation. What could be more honorable?

PERSONAL HISTORY

KENNETH DELMAR JUNKIN

Kenneth Delmar Junkin was born August 12, 1907 at Lakefield, Ontario, he went by the nickname “Dick”. He was educated in the Lakefield Public School System from 1914 to 1922 and completed Grade 7. At 14 years of age Dick left school and went to work.

From 1931 to 1936 Dick worked for Charles Frederick Webster, a contractor in Lakefield, employed as a labourer constructing houses; he earned $20.00 weekly. Dick worked from 1936 to 1939 for a Tobacco Farmer, P. Hagman of Simcoe, Ontario, who grew for the Imperial Tobacco Company in Delhi, Ontario. It was seasonal work, Dick was a Tobacco Grader for 3 years and earned $25.00 weekly. He also worked at the Canada Cement Company in Lakefield as a cement packer for 7 years and worked in the evenings and during the depression years as a boat builder, building canoes and skiffs.

Kenneth Delmar (Dick), born August 12, 1907 in Lakefield, married Ethel Mildred Sparkes (nee Jones*), born January 24, 1909 (a widow with a daughter named Betty), in England on May 23, 1942. Together they had the following children: Betty Ann (Mrs. Murney Lemmon), born December 6, 1933 in England; Barbara Ann (Mrs. Arthur Coles), born July 27, 1943 in England and Patricia Jean (Mrs. Wallace Williams), born June 30, 1944 in England. Dick and his family returned to Canada after the War and settled in Lakefield, Ontario, and had two more daughters; Pamela Ruth (Mrs. Donald Robinson), born October 16, 1946 in Peterborough and Maureen Ethel (Mrs. Robert Vincent), born May 15, 1954 in Peterborough.
*Ethel Mildred Jones married Mr. Sparkes in England, they had a daughter named Betty Ann and a short time later her husband died. The widow, Mrs. Ethel Mildred Sparkes, and her daughter, met Dick Junkin and ended up being married about 9 years later.

Dick enjoyed hunting, playing softball (centre field) and hockey (goalie). His desire on discharge was to work on the Trent-Severn Waterway as a Lock-Master. Dick was also interested in the purchase of a small holding under the Veterans Land Act (VLA). Dick’s desire was fulfilled, he was employed as a Lock-Master at Lock 22 of the Trent-Severn Waterway (Trent Canal) from about 1950 to November 1960. Before moving to Lock 22 Dick and his family had moved to Peterborough from Lakefield. The family lived at the Lock home where Barbara, Patricia and Pamela were married.

Dick was an outpatient at Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto Ontario from 1946 until 1960 being treated for Pulmonary Tuberculosis, deemed as a result of the War. In 1961 he was admitted to the Weston Sanatoium, admitted 22 February 1961, discharged 19 August 1961 for chemo treatment. Dick’s health deteriorated and the family was able to obtain a wartime bungalow on O’Connell Road in the south-end of Peterborough, this was around 1964. We moved to Havelock around 1967 as the doctors said it would be better for Dick’s health (not sure why that would be). By the time Dick’s family moved to Havelock, Ontario from Peterborough he was living in the Peterborough Civic Hospital on oxygen and traveling to his home in Havelock for a day or two visits until his demise. Dick was a member of the Havelock Royal Canadian Legion, Branch No 389. Kenneth Delmar Junkin died July 11, 1970 at the Civic Hospital, Peterborough Ontario at age 62. He is interred in Hillside Cemetery, Lakefield Ontario.
Ethel Mildred Junkin received a Silver Memorial Cross in honour of her husband Dick. The Cross was engraved with “B-76397 Private Kenneth Delmar Junkin”, Maureen has the Cross and letter from Veterans Affairs. Ethel Mildred Junkin (Jones) died November 30, 1981 and is interred in Hillside Cemetery, Lakefield Ontario.

Personal History information courtesy of Maureen Vincent (Junkin).

THE KENNETH DELMAR JUNKIN FAMILY OF LAKEFIELD
Kenneth Delmar’s paternal grandparents were James Albert Junkin, born 1839 & Eliza Junkin; James Albert was from Fenelon Falls, he was a carpenter and lumberman. His maternal grandparents were James Montgomery & Mary Jane Armstrong.
Kenneth Delmar’s parents, Thomas Henry Junkin, born in Bobcaygeon July 1876, married Emily Anne Montgomery, born in Harvey Township April 1878, on August 28, 1903 and they lived at 2 Albert Street, Lakefield Ontario. Thomas Henry was a carpenter and he worked at the Canada Cement Company, Lakefield. They had six children: Edith Eudora, born December 8, 1903, married Charles Weir on June 12, 1924; Ruth Velma, born July 25, 1905 married Howard Hunter Wideman on April 23, 1924 in Toronto; Kenneth Delmar, born August 12, 1908 married Ethel Mildred Jones on May 23,1942; Beatrice Mae (Bea), born October 4, 1909 married Frederick J. Mortlock on May 30, 1931; Madeline June (Jackie), born 1913 married John R. Brown*; Iris Colleen (Billie), born January 20, 1916 married Robert Higgins (Bert) on July 8, 1942 and Thomas (Jr.) Harcourt, born June 28, 1918 married Katharine (Kay) Mose on December 29, 1940.
*Madeline’s first marriage was to David McCullock.

Thomas Henry Junkin was disabled, he couldn’t walk well, he died May 12, 1941 at 66 years of age; his wife Anne Montgomery died June 11, 1944 at 66 years of age — both are interred in Hillside Cemetery, Lakefield.

The 1911 Census has the Junkin family living in Lakefield at 2 Albert St.; the 1921 Census has the Junkin family living in Lakefield on Regent St. In both cases they were renting the house. In 1921 they rented a 6-room home for $10.00 monthly.

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